Legacy Letters

Receiving a letter is usually unexpected, then read thoughtfully and often cherished.

Writing a letter is a whole other story! It can be overwhelming, frustrating and hard work. However, the time and love you put into writing a letter to your children can become part of your legacy. It’s worth it. I learned this when writing a letter to my son, Evan.

An occasional short letter is just as good as one long one. You don’t have to say everything all at once. I learned that after spending months writing eight pages to my son. And it doesn’t need to be perfect. Errors in spelling and grammar are okay.

As your child grows, the things you want to communicate will change. Write a letter to your infant filled with hopes and dreams for his/her future. Write your pre-teen about approaching changes. Identify your teen’s strong character traits and touch on some you would like to see develop. Give your young adult career guidance and tell your grown children what you think of their parenting style.

Use these sentence starters to help formulate your thoughts. Your son or daughter will cherish every word.

  • Your future is unlimited. I dream that someday you will …
  • I am proud of you for …
  • I love you because …
  • I enjoy spending time with you when …
  • In your next phase of life I want you to know …
  • You surprise me by …
  • The character traits I admire in you are …
  • As you mature, I hope to see you …
  • What I want you to know about me is …
  • I hope you remember our family …
  • Your most important role is …
  • The one thing I want you to learn from me is …

Let me know how your writing goes or how the letter is received by your child. Post of photos of you, your child, or the letter using #LegacyLetters.

Onward!

Roy W. Page